Characters

Character Interview, Elizabeth Black, Dowager Countess of Townson, Secondary Character in Liberty for Paul

Hello again, today I have the ever-blunt Elizabeth Black with me. You may remember her as Andrew’s mother from Intentions of the Earl. She’s graciously agreed to meet with me today and I wager we’ll get no refusals to discuss certain topics today.

Quite right. I’ll tell you whatever you want to know.

I bet you will. I understand you’re going to be a grandmother soon, is that exciting?

Yes, very. I was a bit surprised when I’d heard Andrew had married, but shocked really to find Brooke was expecting.

You were?

Yes. When it was discovered she’d not conceived on her wedding night, like I had, I figured my chances of ever holding a grandchild had just evaporated. Apparently, my son was better at convincing his wife to share his bed again than my husband was. Not that he ever tried.

Quite likely. Enough on that. Tell me, do you like Brooke?

Of course I do! She’s the prefect daughter-in-law for me. See, like me, she seems not to give a fig about the rules of propriety. We get along very well, indeed.

Wonderful. I’m glad I could write two people who get along so well. But, I must know, does she do anything that gets on your nerves? Even just a little?

Yes.

Go on.

She has this habit of dragging out all her miniatures and regaling me with stories of her and her sisters. Not that I mind too terribly, mind you. It’s just, well, at times she reminds me of a ninety year old dowager showing off miniatures of her children and grandchildren. Most odd really.

Would it be safe to say you could identify one of her family members in a crowd.

Without a doubt. I could even tell you their interest, naughty deeds as children, even their most embarrassing secrets. I know it all.

Do you have any opinions about Liberty?

That girl needs to quit consulting books about manners in an attempt to find a husband. If she truly wants one of those annoying creatures, she needs to let her hair down and embrace the feelings I suspect she has for a certain individual.

You suspect she has feelings for someone?

Of course she does. No proper young lady gets driven to use the word ballocks by just anyone. Trust me, with all the information Brooke has poured out upon me, I have a sneaking suspicion Liberty has quite an infatuation with the man. Unfortunately, she’ll never admit it to anyone, particularly herself.

Hmm. Do you think she could be convinced to admit to such an emotion?

I suppose. But it doesn’t matter. From what I understand Brooke’s father has forbiden her to even go near the man after she elbowed him in the very same ballocks she accused him of not having.

Brooke told you that?

Not in quite so many words, but I got the general idea. Though I do get the impression she hadn’t intended to hit him there, but the result was the same, nonetheless.

Yes, well, I think that does it for today. Thank you for taking your time travel carriage to the year 2011 to talk to me, Elizabeth. Join me tomorrow for an exclusive interview with Turner, the family’s unusually unusual butler! Until then!

Characters

Character Intereviews, John and Carolina Banks, Secondary Characters from Liberty for Paul

Good morning, as you know, I’ve been dragging the characters from Liberty for Paul out from under the cobwebs of my mind and conducting interviews with them this week to give an insider’s look at the relationship between Paul and Liberty and what to expect in their story. Today I am speaking with John and Carolina Banks, Liberty’s parents. What can you tell me about said relationship, Mrs. Banks?

CB: Not much, I’m afraid. The two seem to despise each other to no end and never really speak to one another.

Yes, I gathered that. Mr. Banks, do you have anything to add?

 

JB: No. I think Carolina said it best. For some reason the two have been at odds since just after I first introduced them.

I see. Mrs. Banks, I assume you were there, too, do you think something happen at that first introduction that caused the friction?

 

CB: It’s possible.

Possible?

 

CB: Well, he might have inadvertently crossed a line as far as Liberty is concerned.

And?

 

JB: It’s probably best we don’t go into all that. I love my daughter and would do anything to protect her from scorn, so since talking about such a topic may not be in her best interest, I think it best we speak about something else.

I find it rather curious you say you’d do anything to protect Liberty. Just how far would you go?

 

JB: As far as I have to. But hopefully she’ll continue to stay on her best behavior and I’ll not be forced to behave inappropriately.

Her best behavior, eh? And what of Mr. Grimes and his behavior?

 

CB: Pish posh. Paul is a very fine gentleman. Besides Liberty’s imagined impropriety about the man, he is a perfectly respectable man. I complete faith in him.

Let’s have a moment of honesty, have either of you ever thought you’d like to see him as your son-in-law?

 

Both: YES!

 

JB: Unfortunately, that won’t be happening. Madison has a very strong aversion to marriage in general that matches Liberty’s aversion to Paul.

And if by some chance he did become your son-in-law?

 

CB: Then we’d be attending a funeral a short time later.

JB: The only question is: whose?

All right. Let’s say for some unseen reason the two do decide to marry, urp hold your objections, this is all hypothetical. Now, say they decide to marry, I’d assume Mrs. Banks, as her mother, you’d help her plan an extravagant wedding.

CB: Of course I would! It’s the mother’s duty to guide her daughter on her most important day.

And what of the very important wedding night? Will you be “guiding” her about that, too?

 

CB: I—I—I sup—suppose so, yes.

Would you care to give us a quick rundown of that speech?

 

CB: Absolutely not. That is a private conversation had between a young girl and her mother!

Forgive me. I didn’t mean to pry. I was just making sure she was going to be properly informed.

 

CB: She will be. Not that it’s any of your business.

Good to know. It would be absolutely terrible if she lacked the knowledge on such a sub—

 

CB: She’ll be informed. Now can we change the subject, please?

Of course. Would you like me to open a window, your face looks awfully red?

 

CB: Just finish your questions so we can go back to the Regency where we belong.

Right. Well, actually I think I’m out of questions and nearly out of time. But before we go, Mr. Banks, can you please tell us how you’d handle things if an article were to appear in the newspaper suggesting Liberty tried to seduce Mr. Grimes?

 

JB: What?!

 

Hypothetically speaking, of course.

 

JB: I don’t know what I’d do after I scraped myself up off the floor in shock. Fall back down again, perhaps.

Very good, then. That’s all we have time for today. Join us tomorrow when we talk to Elizabeth Black, the dowager Countess of Townson. Until then, you can find out how Mr. Banks responds if such an article were to appear (hypothetically, of course) or if Liberty is properly informed of what to expect by clicking here. Until then, good day.